#DayWithoutImmigrants

Cities and streets are overflowing with yells, protests, and banners all demanding an end to the racism and discrimination against immigrants. On February 16, 2017, many minority-and foreign-born people refused to go to school, work, or out shopping to prove that businesses and consumer spending cannot thrive in the economy without their labor. A campaign and simple hashtag played a rippling effect as the movement began to spread throughout various social medias and in the streets of cities. The hashtag “#DayWithoutImmigrants” trended on Twitter, and Snapchat created a story showing videos and photos of participants in the marches and boycotts. Advocates organized events, made flyers, and called upon friends and families to participate in the cause. “Strangers of all different races and backgrounds rejoiced in fighting for a single cause, no longer divided by their differences.”

In California, diversity thrives. Walking down the streets, residents can find an array of different foods available: Mexican restaurant, Vietnamese Pho, entree of curry, or enjoying ice cream that originates from Thailand. We’re constantly exposed to the different types of food and culture. Cultural diversity allows us to  learn from one another and helps us understand different perspectives within the world in which we live. Different ideas  are acknowledged and valued, contributing to society in making decisions that can make a difference or change in the world. he U.S. is known for its entertainment industry, and our country is much more interesting to live in when we put our own lives in the lens of others.

A Hispanic student (11)  at Garden Grove High School decided to skip a day at school to highlight the important role in which immigrants play in society. Her anonymous response to the movement was “Initially, I heard of Day Without Immigrants through my family on Facebook. I decided to participate in the event to show how a world without immigrants and how much immigrants impact this country. My parents did not go to work, and my brothers skipped school. The more people who joined, the better, because it really shows who we are as a nation.” Overall, she believes that America should be a land of freedom and an open door to those who face the same struggles despite of their skin color, race, or beliefs. After all, our founding forefathers created a nation n which “all men are created equal.”